Forensics

Finding Reflective DLL Injections

DLL injections that originate from a malicious DLL written to a disk are commonly detected by any decent AV product. Detecting reflective DLL injection, however, are not as straightforward. Malware injected directly into a process using reflective DLL injection typically will not exist on disk. A co-worker of mine developed

Search Exchange 2010 Mailboxes

NOTE: The user you run the script with must have the “Discovery Management” RBAC Role. This script will search all mailboxes for email with attachments named “document1” and “document2” regardless of the file extension. The script will then copy the email message to the “admin.mailbox” mailbox in a folder called

Bare Monkey (Volatility)

I’ve been working on Bare Monkey for a few months now. Bare Monkey inputs a Windows memory capture and runs it against all Volatility plugins and outputs them to a text file. Afterwards, it deletes the generated files that are empty and then compresses the files left. It also creates

Parsing Metadata with ExifTool

Its one thing to have a piece of data but its another thing to be able to get the metadata about said data. ExifTool (http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool/) is a tool that will allow just that. Its command line based but there is a GUI version as well called pyExifTool (https://hvdwolf.github.io/pyExifToolGUI/). The tool

Forensics Posters

Anybody getting into forensics knows its like putting on a pair of glasses and seeing things in a whole new light. Part of being able to identify bad or evil is being able to identify normal. In my opinion, SANS did a pretty good job depicting some common things to